FRONT LINES: POLITICAL PLAYS BY AMERICAN WOMEN

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FRONT LINES: POLITICAL PLAYS BY AMERICAN WOMEN


FRONT LINES contains plays by the country's leading playwrights, dramatizing issues at the forefront of our times.

THE EXONERATED
by Jessica Blank and Erik Jensen

WORDS OF CHOICE
by Cindy Cooper

NARAL PRO-CHOICE AMERICA HONORED "WORDS OF CHOICE" WITH THE PRESTIGIOUS 2009 CHAMPION OF CHOICE AWARD

ELLIOT, A SOLDIER'S FUGUE
by Quiara Alegria Hudes

CLARENCE DARROW'S LAST TRIAL
by Shirley Lauro

MRS. PACKARD
by Emily Mann

NO CHILD...
by Nilaja Sun

HOT 'N' THROBBING
by Paula Vogel



From LIBRARY JOURNAL:

"Plays tell stories, and the best ones stay with us. Compiled by theater critic Greene (Women Who Write Plays) and playwright Lauro (Open Admissions), the stories in this collection of critically acclaimed works by seven leading female playwrights address some of the most contentious of contemporary issues, and they will stick in readers' minds for a long time. Cindy Cooper's Words of Choice looks at the issue of reproductive choice in first-person accounts, poems, and satire. In Elliot, A Soldier's Fugue, Quiara Alegría Hudes deftly interweaves the tales of three generations of Latino men who served in Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq. The Exonerated, by Jessica Blank and Erik Jensen, is based on interviews with men and women on death row for crimes they did not commit. Also included are plays by Paula Vogel, Emily Mann, Lauro, and Nilaja Sun. Recommended for all academic and public drama collections." —Carolyn M. Mulac, Chicago P.L.



From DRAMATICS MAGAZINE:

"The plays of Front Lines offer ammunition and inspiration for any director, of either gender, looking to take students once more into the breach."




From RH REALITY CHECK
By Sarah Seltzer

"Words of Choice" appears in the anthology Front Lines edited by Alexis Greene, and Shirley Lauro--all of which is worth reading. Front Lines is a group of political plays by American women, many of which got considerable media attention when they were first staged ("The Exonerated" about wrongful imprisonment and "No Child,' which tackles education in particular). It's exciting to see so many of these plays together because they do make a powerful point about creative women taking on a whole range of issues, from domestic violence to war to legal injustice. Any lingering stereotypes that political writing is a masculine realm are rendered ridiculous.